The Weblog

We send out cool articles and farmer highlights using a different email program. You can see the archives of those emails here and through our facebook page! We use this “weblog” every Friday evening to let you know the market page is accepting orders (look for the little add to cart buttons next to products). Northeast Georgia Locally Grown was officially OPENED on Monday, April 26th, 2010 and we are so thankful that you are helping support fresh local foods each week.



 
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Locally Grown - Availability for August 21, 2013


Hey Local Food Lovers,

I just want to congratulate everyone for making our August sales amongst the best we’ve had here at Locally Grown. We’ve consistently sold over $1,000 of local food each week so far in August, and this month (especially after school starts back) is usually more a slumping time of year. I think that’s a really encouraging sign that more and more of you are eating local consistently each week of the year. As everyone knows there’s probably been a little less availability at each farm this year due to the crazy rain, but with the number of farms and other food producers increasing slightly this year we’ve been able to hold steady on supply. Even this week with our two of our biggest producers taking a week off (Leah Lake and Ohana Farms) sales are excellent. So thank-you to everyone who is making that happen.

Each week there are more things to talk about than I have time to plug. One very important one is to buy goat cheeses from SPLIT CREEK FARMS in SC this week. Those of you who have tried these cheeses, yogurt, fudge and other products know that we’re lucky to have such a great goat dairy just an hour drive away. Thanks to Teri Parker and her willingness to go pick up these orders a few times a year we all get to enjoy this as a special treat now and then. Since the next order won’t be until November this is your chance until late Fall. Don’t miss it. And if you don’t know what to try I highly recommend the Feta in oil. Of all the feta cheeses I’ve had in my life that one is the best. And I don’t let a drop of the oil it’s packed in go to waste. The spices and bits of cheese make it the perfect oil to add to a casserole or even on top of some roasted potatoes. Every last bit is fantastic.

I also want to remind folks to visit Lake Rabun Hotel and Restaurant’s Featured Farmer Thursdays. Chef Jamie Alred is one of the best things to ever happen to local food in North Georgia and if you don’t believe me go judge for yourself. I always say that when he features each farm, that’s the best their food will taste all year long. To further demonstrate his commitment to local farms he just released a cookbook that features recipes from nine farms all located in the North Georgia Mountains. I haven’t seen it yet, but it’ll definitely be on my shelf soon, or more likely on the counter slowly getting covered with flour, olive oil and sauce spatters the way all my really good cook books do.

The remaining schedule for Featured Farmer Thursdays is as follows:

August
22: Chattooga Belle Farm, Long Creek, SC, apples, Ed and Kitty Land
29: Local Goods and Gardens, Clayton, GA, figs and produce, Ryan Allred and Christine Smith
September
5: Taylor Family Farm, Lakemont, GA, David Taylor
12: Old School Community Garden, Sustainable Mountain Living Communities (S.M.L.C), Clayton, GA, a donation will be
given to the S.M.L.C. for use of produce from the Old School Community Garden; and
Turning Creek Artisans, Clayton, GA, honey, Bob Grant,
19: C-Z Farm, Tiger, GA, Pat Crunkleton
26: Trillium Gardens, Clarkesville, GA, micro greens, Steve Whiteman
October
3: Gibson Farms, Westminster, SC, certified organic grass fed beef, Leland Gibson
10: Ladybug Farms, Persimmon Valley, Rabun County, GA, Teri Jagger Blincoe
17: Burton Mountain Farms, Rabun County, GA, Sid Blalock
24: Chattooga Belle Farm, Long Creek, SC, apples and persimmons, Ed and Kitty Land, and
Turning Creek Artisans, Clayton, GA, honey, Bob Grant
31: Stack Farm, Tiger, GA, persimmons and Asian pears, Bill and Leckie Stack
November
7: Leah Lake Farms, Smithbridge Township, NC, Brooks Franklin
14: Mill Gap Farm, Tiger, GA, Chuck and Amy Mashburn
21: Tiger Mountain Vineyards, Tiger, GA, recipes using 100% Georgia grown wine, John and Martha Ezzard

Last but definitely not least the Habersham County School system officially kicked off their 2013 Farm To School program this month. Liberty Farms (who is selling tons of okra this week) is the first featured farm and they’ll be feeding every kid at Wilbanks Middle School their fresh potatoes sometime this week I think. Not only that, each of the ten farms that will be featured this year were put into a school calendar so that students, teachers and parents will come to know the farms and foods their kids are eating each month of the year. How’s that for cool!

Here’s a quick list of the farms (and their products) that are participating in this amazing program.

1.) Chattooga Belle Farm, Kitty & Ed Land: Apples
2.) Leah Lake Farm, Brooks Franklin: Beets, Carrots, Spring Onions, Swiss Chard, and Lettuce
3.) Liberty Farm, Jerry, Sherry & Wesley Gerrin: Tomatoes and Irish Potatoes
4.) Melon Head Farm, Joni & Harold Kennedy: Cantaloupe, Rhubarb, Sweet Potatoes, and Watermelon
5.) Mill Gap Farm, Chuck & Amy Mashburn: Sweet Hakurei Turnips
6.) Mountain Earth Farm, Ronnie Mathis: Zucchini Squash, Tomatoes, Lettuce, Kale, Cabbage, and Snap Beans
7.) Shook’s Farm, Angel & Steve Rushing, Thelma & Michael Shook: Eggplant, Peppers, Summer & Butternut Squash
8.) Sylvan Falls Mill, Linda Johnson: Cornmeal and Whole Wheat Flour
9.) Trillium Farm, Steve Whiteman: MicroGreens
10.) Widebottom Farm, James & Phillip Franklin: Watermelon, Peppers, and Peaches

I still plan to tell you all about the Thai cooking school as promised at some point but as usual, I’m behind schedule. When I do finally get around to it I want to include some photos and some recipes so I need to set aside some time to make all that happen at once.

Until then Thanks for supporting our local farms and….
EAT WELL,
Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown Availability list for August 21 market.


Good Evening All,
The market is now open for orders. Split Creek Farm has listed their great goat milk products this week. Stock up now as thay will not be available again until November.
Have a great week-end.

Locally Grown - Availability for August 14, 2013


Hey Local Food Lovers,

It’s good to be home. A coupe of nights ago we slow mesquite smoked a rump roast of grassfed beef covered with chopped rosemary, basil, oregano and garlic that came from Belflower Gardens, along with some fresh corn from Oakcrest Farms, with a side of cucumber and tomato salad with basil and balsamic vinegar (courtesy of Mountain Earth and Burton Mtn Farms) and some rosemary toast. I smiled at my wife during the meal and said “This is what American food is!”

As much as I absolutely loved eating Asian cuisine over the last nearly four weeks, I am so glad to be home and enjoying the unique tastes of home. A visit abroad gives you a great appreciation for the way other cultures eat….but it also really helps remind you what it special about our home cuisine….at least the type of cuisine I’ve come to appreciate over the last 5-10 years.

How to eat good food is as important as how to grow good food. Most of what I’ve learned about how to grow good food has come from hanging out and asking questions of farmers. When it comes to eating good food…..I have to admit I spend a lot of time with cookbooks and the internet. People tell me about a dish they like all the time, but without those details, the quantities and step by step instructions…it too often goes in one ear and out the other. Even though we’ve had a recipe section on the website here for over a year there’s still only 11 recipes on there….4 of which I posted! Perhaps there’s a more interesting way for our community of local eaters to exchange recipe ideas, but so far this and our facebook page are the best options.

Since I know for a fact that this rare roast recipe will blow your mind if you do it right i’m gonna post another one. We’ve already eaten half the roast but I’ll take a photo of it next time I pull it out because it looks as beautiful as it tastes.

I still promise to talk some more about our food adventures in Asia, but this week I’m feeling good about being home and enjoying it so much. This roast was a really nice part of that experience.

GARLIC AND HERB CRUSTED SLOW SMOKED PRIME RIB (other other roast)

1/4 cups of basil, oregano, parsley, rosemary (that’s one full cup of herbs) and 1/4 cup garlic
3 tablespoons olive oil
tablespoon fresh ground pepper and kosher salt
12-14 lb roast

Directions:
Trim tough fat from the roast
Chop the garlic and herbs and press into the sides of the roast
Allow to stand at room temp for 45 minutes or store overnight in a freezer bag. Allow meat to stand at room temp before grilling.

Grill the roast over INDIRECT heat until internal temp is 135. (Wood chips go over the flame in tinfoil or container according to instructions)

Keep grills temp between 275-300 for 3.5 to 4 hours. When done remove and wrap in foil for 20-30 mintues. Roast will continue to cook with temp rising an additional 5-10 degrees.

After the meat rests you can carve using a sharp knife. The roast will be rare.

That’s it! My cousin made this last Christmas and I’ve made it 4 or 5 times since then and it’s just incredible.

The cucumber tomato salad is another summer favorite and equally easy. Just peel cucumber and chop with tomato to 1/4 inch size. Add fresh chopped basil and two-three tablespoons of balsamic vinegar. Other options are 1 tbl spoon of olive oil, onion, and fresh pepper. It’s delicious. You can add other herbs that you may like.

Ok, that’s probably good for tonight!

I hope a few of you may be in the mood to can or freeze some okra to enjoy the whole year round. You can get a whole peck for just $20 which is quite a deal. Share some with your friends and family. And if you like spicy food try it in Bhindi Masala which is my new favorite way to eat okra. That recipe is on the website as well.

Have a great week and EAT WELL,

Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun

Locally Grown - Availability for August 14, 2013


Hey Local Food Lovers,

It’s good to be home. A coupe of nights ago we slow mesquite smoked a rump roast of grassfed beef covered with chopped rosemary, basil, oregano and garlic that came from Belflower Gardens, along with some fresh corn from Oakcrest Farms, with a side of cucumber and tomato salad with basil and balsamic vinegar (courtesy of Mountain Earth and Burton Mtn Farms) and some rosemary toast. I smiled at my wife during the meal and said “This is what American food is!”

As much as I absolutely loved eating Asian cuisine over the last nearly four weeks, I am so glad to be home and enjoying the unique tastes of home. A visit abroad gives you a great appreciation for the way other cultures eat….but it also really helps remind you what it special about our home cuisine….at least the type of cuisine I’ve come to appreciate over the last 5-10 years.

How to eat good food is as important as how to grow good food. Most of what I’ve learned about how to grow good food has come from hanging out and asking questions of farmers. When it comes to eating good food…..I have to admit I spend a lot of time with cookbooks and the internet. People tell me about a dish they like all the time, but without those details, the quantities and step by step instructions…it too often goes in one ear and out the other. Even though we’ve had a recipe section on the website here for over a year there’s still only 11 recipes on there….4 of which I posted! Perhaps there’s a more interesting way for our community of local eaters to exchange recipe ideas, but so far this and our facebook page are the best options.

Since I know for a fact that this rare roast recipe will blow your mind if you do it right i’m gonna post another one. We’ve already eaten half the roast but I’ll take a photo of it next time I pull it out because it looks as beautiful as it tastes.

I still promise to talk some more about our food adventures in Asia, but this week I’m feeling good about being home and enjoying it so much. This roast was a really nice part of that experience.

GARLIC AND HERB CRUSTED SLOW SMOKED PRIME RIB (other other roast)

1/4 cups of basil, oregano, parsley, rosemary (that’s one full cup of herbs) and 1/4 cup garlic
3 tablespoons olive oil
tablespoon fresh ground pepper and kosher salt
12-14 lb roast

Directions:
Trim tough fat from the roast
Chop the garlic and herbs and press into the sides of the roast
Allow to stand at room temp for 45 minutes or store overnight in a freezer bag. Allow meat to stand at room temp before grilling.

Grill the roast over INDIRECT heat until internal temp is 135. (Wood chips go over the flame in tinfoil or container according to instructions)

Keep grills temp between 275-300 for 3.5 to 4 hours. When done remove and wrap in foil for 20-30 mintues. Roast will continue to cook with temp rising an additional 5-10 degrees.

After the meat rests you can carve using a sharp knife. The roast will be rare.

That’s it! My cousin made this last Christmas and I’ve made it 4 or 5 times since then and it’s just incredible.

The cucumber tomato salad is another summer favorite and equally easy. Just peel cucumber and chop with tomato to 1/4 inch size. Add fresh chopped basil and two-three tablespoons of balsamic vinegar. Other options are 1 tbl spoon of olive oil, onion, and fresh pepper. It’s delicious. You can add other herbs that you may like.

Ok, that’s probably good for tonight!

I hope a few of you may be in the mood to can or freeze some okra to enjoy the whole year round. You can get a whole peck for just $20 which is quite a deal. Share some with your friends and family. And if you like spicy food try it in Bhindi Masala which is my new favorite way to eat okra. That recipe is on the website as well.

Have a great week and EAT WELL,

Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun

Locally Grown - Availability for August 14, 2013


Hey Local Food Lovers,

It’s good to be home. A coupe of nights ago we slow mesquite smoked a rump roast of grassfed beef covered with chopped rosemary, basil, oregano and garlic that came from Belflower Gardens, along with some fresh corn from Oakcrest Farms, with a side of cucumber and tomato salad with basil and balsamic vinegar (courtesy of Mountain Earth and Burton Mtn Farms) and some rosemary toast. I smiled at my wife during the meal and said “This is what American food is!”

As much as I absolutely loved eating Asian cuisine over the last nearly four weeks, I am so glad to be home and enjoying the unique tastes of home. A visit abroad gives you a great appreciation for the way other cultures eat….but it also really helps remind you what it special about our home cuisine….at least the type of cuisine I’ve come to appreciate over the last 5-10 years.

How to eat good food is as important as how to grow good food. Most of what I’ve learned about how to grow good food has come from hanging out and asking questions of farmers. When it comes to eating good food…..I have to admit I spend a lot of time with cookbooks and the internet. People tell me about a dish they like all the time, but without those details, the quantities and step by step instructions…it too often goes in one ear and out the other. Even though we’ve had a recipe section on the website here for over a year there’s still only 11 recipes on there….4 of which I posted! Perhaps there’s a more interesting way for our community of local eaters to exchange recipe ideas, but so far this and our facebook page are the best options.

Since I know for a fact that this rare roast recipe will blow your mind if you do it right i’m gonna post another one. We’ve already eaten half the roast but I’ll take a photo of it next time I pull it out because it looks as beautiful as it tastes.

I still promise to talk some more about our food adventures in Asia, but this week I’m feeling good about being home and enjoying it so much. This roast was a really nice part of that experience.

GARLIC AND HERB CRUSTED SLOW SMOKED PRIME RIB (other other roast)

1/4 cups of basil, oregano, parsley, rosemary (that’s one full cup of herbs) and 1/4 cup garlic
3 tablespoons olive oil
tablespoon fresh ground pepper and kosher salt
12-14 lb roast

Directions:
Trim tough fat from the roast
Chop the garlic and herbs and press into the sides of the roast
Allow to stand at room temp for 45 minutes or store overnight in a freezer bag. Allow meat to stand at room temp before grilling.

Grill the roast over INDIRECT heat until internal temp is 135. (Wood chips go over the flame in tinfoil or container according to instructions)

Keep grills temp between 275-300 for 3.5 to 4 hours. When done remove and wrap in foil for 20-30 mintues. Roast will continue to cook with temp rising an additional 5-10 degrees.

After the meat rests you can carve using a sharp knife. The roast will be rare.

That’s it! My cousin made this last Christmas and I’ve made it 4 or 5 times since then and it’s just incredible.

The cucumber tomato salad is another summer favorite and equally easy. Just peel cucumber and chop with tomato to 1/4 inch size. Add fresh chopped basil and two-three tablespoons of balsamic vinegar. Other options are 1 tbl spoon of olive oil, onion, and fresh pepper. It’s delicious. You can add other herbs that you may like.

Ok, that’s probably good for tonight!

I hope a few of you may be in the mood to can or freeze some okra to enjoy the whole year round. You can get a whole peck for just $20 which is quite a deal. Share some with your friends and family. And if you like spicy food try it in Bhindi Masala which is my new favorite way to eat okra. That recipe is on the website as well.

Have a great week and EAT WELL,

Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown availability list for August 9


Good evening all,
This week we welcome Justin and Ching- Yu back from their culinary tour of Asia. We hope they will share some great recipes with us.
Check the availability list now and don’t forget to check back again Sunday evening for late additions to the market. Remember you can make multiple orders if you like.
Have a great week-end.

Availability list for NortheastGeorgia.Locallygrown.net Aug. 2


Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is now open for orders. Have a great weekend and remember your local
Farmers Markets.

Locally Grown - Availability for July 31st, 2013


Hey Local Food Lovers,

These are the final days of a pretty memorable visit to Thailand so out of respect for the limited time I have to enjoy where I am, I’m going to be brief in my message. And the internet connection here is pretty unreliable too so I should be quick.

Last week we went to an incredible Thai cooking school on an organic farm that I look forward to describing in detail. One reason that has been one of the highlights of the entire trip is that I can imagine north Georgia having a similar setup in which people travel to the mountains to learn how different crops grow and how to cook them. Confidence in cooking is one of the key ingredients to re-inventing a local food culture, and the respect that our teacher elicited for organic farming, for each different species of plant that is used, for the art of cooking, how to taste and adjust, and embracing a philosophy and way of life behind all of it were really beautiful. He also told lots of jokes! We started at 8:20 in the morning and finished at 3:30 and it was endlessly interesting the entire time. And hopefully now we know how to cook Thai food pretty comfortably.

I’m not sure what is listed this week, but I’m sure it’s tasty and delicious. I look forward to placing my own order this time next week and returning to all the wonderful aspects of home.

Until Then…. EAT WELL,

Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun

Availabilty list for Northeast Georgia Locally Grown


Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is now open for orders until 9:00 pm Monday evening. Pick up your orders between 5:00 and 7:00 Wednesday evening.

Locally Grown - Availability for July 24th, 2013


Hey Local Food Lovers,

So this message is coming to your from Chiang Mai Thailand. Before I describe the local foods I’ve been enjoying let me start by plugging all the incredible food that has landed on Locally Grown this week. It’s an 11 hour time difference here so the first thing I did upon waking up was scroll through this week’s offerings. I have to admit that even though I am greatly enjoying the food here, it made me a tad homesick to see what I’ll be missing.

The first thing I noticed that made me smile is we have so many new farms and food producers this year bringing a wider diversity of crops. That’s a trend I expect and hope will continue b/c as they say (and I embrace) diversity is the spice of life.

The things that caught my attention were: CORN! We’ve always had an underabundance of sweet corn so it’s great to see Oakcrest Farms with one of the best tastes of summer. Melon Head’s chinese noodle beans look great, and i love that they are mixing their greens and their reds for nice color on the plate. There are tons of cucumbers and garlic and quite a few flowers. There are also the seasons first peppers and…….just in case you didn’t notice….TOMATOES. That’s what I’m really jealous of. I guess I’ll have to wait until I return to have my first heirloom tomato sandwich.

Ok, I’ve only got a few minutes so let me tell you just a tiny bit about my food adventures. Street vendor food is a way of life in Thailand just as it was in Taiwan. Last night Chiang Mai had a night market that was attended by thousands. If I had to guess I’d say there were close to 100 different street food vendors scattered all over the city. For those who haven’t experienced this I’ll try and describe it. Usually vendors will be clustered in certain areas so that people can wander around and see what they would like. We can’t read a word of Thai so we have to look and watch what each vendor is making and then point when we see what we’d like. We’re slowly picking up a few words like “moo” for pork. Most vendors cook either cook over a grittle built into the cart, or more frequently a wok that they set up over a gas flame slightly away from the cart. Depending on how popular that cart is they may have a help who is handing them the cut up ingredients for each dish as the orders come in. The owner is always the one standing over the flame. It’s quite fun to watch them whip up your food right in front of you.

We don’t know all the names of the dishes we’ve had but here’s some quick descriptions:
Pad Thai – you’ve probably had this – it’s a peanut flavored noodle dish we’ve had served with chicken, or shrimp, pork and cabbage which is cooked in a pot rather than a wok and served with a spicy sauce, stuffed fried peppers with chicken (this was one of our favorites), chicken noodle soup (that had a mixture of regular and fried noodles), papaya salad (papaya, carrots in a spicy sauce), roasted chicken and pork (the pork is especially amazing because of a sweet sauce they drizzle over it). Then there are tons and tons of juice and smoothie stands where you can get fresh mango, passion fruit, papaya and a dozen other fruits. Best smoothies I’ve ever had I think. Mango mojito which is without the rum but with the mint is my favorite.

One of the coolest local foods is this thing called Roti which is dough that is fried on griddle with banana inside and then drizzled with condensed milk. That is a heavenly dessert!

I don’t think there is such a thing as organic street food, so it’s not perfect in that way, but the exposure to all these dishes is pretty amazing. We are going to a Thai cooking school next week that is on an organic farm, so maybe I’ll have some healthier things to describe last week.

Time to get on the motorbike and head into the mountains for a few days.

Hope you enjoy all the local food back home and …..
EAT WELL,
Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun