The Weblog

Welcome to Northeast Georgia Locally Grown’s weblog. Mainly this is a collection of e-mails that we send out each week to kick off the market, but also tells the tale of our little market. The market was officially OPENED and our first orders taken on Monday, April 26th, 2010 with our pick-up on Wednesday, April 28th, 2010. Though small at the beginning our market has grown pretty well, Selling $25,000 by December 31, 2010, and nearly $40,000 by our anniversary on April 28th, 2011. The site will be opened for shopping Friday evening at 9:00pm and remain open for shopping until 9:00pm Monday evening.



 
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Market is Open for Orders!


Good Evening Locavores!

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is open for orders!
Go to the market now >>

Market Open for Orders!


Good Evening Locavores!

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is open for orders!
Go to the market now >>

Market Open for Orders!


Good Evening Locavores!

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is open for orders!
Go to the market now >>

Market Open for Orders!


Good Evening Locavores!

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is open for orders!
Go to the market now >>

Northeast Georgia Locallygrown availability list for January 15


Good Evening Locavores,
Your Locallygrown market is now open for orders.

Weblog Entry


Good Evening Locavores!

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is open for orders!
Go to the market now >>

Weblog Entry


Good Evening Locavores!

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is open for orders!
Go to the market now >>

Market Is Open For Orders!


Good Evening Locavores and Happy New Year!

Northeast Georgia Locally Grown is open for orders!
Go to the market now >>

Northeast Georgia Locallygrown availability list for Dec.18


Good evening Locavores,
Welcome to market for this very special Holiday!
This cold blustery night should add greater appreciation to the fact that as you enjoy the cozy warmth of your homes you may also shop your Locallygrown market for Christmas treats and treasures.
Old Man Winter has been gentle with the farmers this year so a wide selection of vegetables are still available. You won’t find a Christmas goose but, there are many cuts and roasts of poultry, pork, and beef to choose from.
The bakers have offered up some fantastic desserts from Christmas cookies and gingerbread men to cakes, stollen, and that so special buche de noel by Sylvan Falls Mill.
We farmers, managers, and volunteers at Locallygrown wish for you to have a joyous Christmas with friends and family. Be happy, fulfilled, and safe and let the kid in you feel the wonder of Christmas.
Your market is now open for orders.

Comparing vegetables to people…


Comparing vegetables to people…

I enjoy diverse groups of people and spending time with unique individuals from different walks of life. I feel it’s important to gain new perspectives, experiences, and a sense of empathy. When I make the time to push past my bubble of comfort, I take away tiny gems of thought that I would have never conjured up myself. I would also get very bored hanging around identical types of people, everyday, for my whole life.

I liken this to eating the same kind of vegetables every day, for my whole life… just boring. It is easy to get stuck in routine, but never be afraid to mix it up a bit! Eating a diversity of whole foods is more important than finding a superfood or eating the same vegetable or fruit for months.

What do I mean by diversity? ’Tis a good question! In my mind, diversity of food could mean anything from a different variety of tomato to eating a different part of a plant. Diversity could mean a different cooking style, or a different pairing or side item. Since I am currently a “conscious” omnivore, I enjoy the seasonal approach to a diverse diet: heavier on hardy greens and root veggies in Fall, heavier on stored grains, meats, and canned veggies in Winter, and all the abundance Spring and Summer offer. Don’t make it complicated, make it your own. If you notice you always prepare baked sweet potatoes every Tuesday, or only tried turnips once… mix it up.

Edible whole foods are fascinating. In the wild, I assume their genetic makeup would constantly be changing, and their taste would change as their environment changes. I promise that science hasn’t discovered or measured everything that our body needs to fit that ideal spectrum of health. So try something new.

Embrace the subtle differences in a new variety of carrot, the Hakurei turnips, the Chinese cabbage, or the Red Jewel sweet potatoes because…

If the diversity of plants dwindle, resilience dwindles. When you choose to buy the lesser known variety, you are supporting ecological diversity on small farms in this region (with nutritional value for your body as an added bonus)!

Go to the market (open ’til 9pm Monday) >>
Andrew in Hall
Chuck in Rabun
Teri in Habersham